Workers who quit voluntarily usually are not eligible for unemployment benefits, unless they can show they had a “necessitous and compelling” reason for leaving their employment, as was the case in a recent claim filed by a former employee of AT&T.

The claimant quit her job after she repeatedly informed management that she was being sexually harassed. She even called the police on several occasions to report that one harasser was following her and making racial slurs.

While the employer fought the claim, arguing that the claimant had not filed complaints with several offices within the company or with the union and so had not made a true effort to preserve her job, a Pennsylvania court found that the claimant was eligible for benefits because she put up with a lot while making reasonable attempts to get her bosses to address the problem before submitting her resignation.

Read more about the case here: http://www.pennlive.com/news/2017/04/woman_who_quit_over_sexual_har.html